A soft hackle streamer (according to my point of view)

The Wood Duck Heron, created by Nick Lambreaux from New Hampshire, is a very interesting fly that has only two feathers in its construction, one from the flank of the wood duck and the other from a heron tied as a collar.
This one in the photo is a more “humble” version that uses the same tying technique but with a Mallard duck flank feather dyed yellow and a pale yellow chicken feather as a collar replacing the originals mentioned above.
The hook can be Mustad 9672, 9671 or any similar hook in size 8, 10 or 12.

Brookie on sunny day

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This photo is from a couple of seasons ago, the reflection of the sun in the water indicates that it is close to noon.
The Fontinalis of Pampa de Achala are very active at that time, especially in the fall when their colors become more beautiful.

Patagonian memories (7) Chimehuin river

It was once a fly fishing Mecca in Patagonia Argentina.
I met him, perhaps, at a less productive time but he still gave me great satisfaction.
Today it continues to be a very important river for those of us who recognize and value its mystique and its trout.

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achalabrookies

achalabrookies

achalabrookies

Black Nymph

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This nymph pattern is highly effective, “one of those who never fail.”

Hook: Heavy, for nymph. Size 12, 14, 16, 18
Thread: 8/0 black
Tail: Pheasant tail feather fibers
Rib: Fine copper wire
Abdomen and Thorax: Fine black wool cord
Wingcase: Pheasant Tail Feather Fibers (varnished)

Connecticut beauty

This photo was sent to me by Alan Petrucci from the USA, please notice those gorgeous colors in this specimen of brookie.
Thank you very much Alan.                                                                                     

Photo Alan Petrucci

Rhode Island jewels

Paul Pezza has kindly sent me some photos of attractive fontinalis from Rhode Island USA.
For those who do not know, I always like to show brook trouts on my blog, wherever they come from.
If you want to share a photo of your favorite brookies, I will be very happy to publish them here with the appropriate mention.
My email is huberzil@hotmail.com

Photo Paul Pezza

Photo Paul Pezza

Photo Paul Pezza

The soft feathers of my backyard (part two)

I have a special inclination to use natural materials in the making of my flies.
In these modern times when synthetics make our artificials seem more “lures” than flies, it is very interesting for me to pay attention to the loose feathers that I find out there in my backyard and also on the banks of rivers and streams that I visit regularly during the season.
It is very personal, but I feel that somehow I am maintaining a certain tradition in addition to providing added value to my fly tying.
I show you here some more flies in which I have used some of these “treasures”.

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The soft feathers of my backyard

Fortunately I live in an area rich in birdlife.
The backyard of my house is a meeting place for several species of small birds because I always leave them water and some seeds for food.
In return, they leave me some scattered feathers that come off after their occasional baths.
Many times these feathers are excellent for tying soft hackle flies.
Here I show you some flies that I have tied with those feathers.

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achalabrookies

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achalabrookies

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Patagonia Salvaje (Wild Patagonia)

I want to share a video.
It shows very aesthetically landscapes and part of the wild fauna of our beloved Patagonia.
Thanks to Pablo Saracco (whom I do not have the pleasure to meet personally) for his talent for transmitting realities and feelings through his videos and photographs.

youtube.com/watch?v=Nv7JPi4QhAk

Patagonian memories (6) Quilquihue river, Brown trout in the net

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This photo is from the last century.
More precisely from about 1986.
I am holding the first catch of that day.
It was taken at the beginning of the season (November) on the Quilquihue river in a section that runs right next to the San Martín de los Andes “Chapelco” airport in the Patagonian province of Neuquèn.
I remember that we asked the airport manager for permission to walk across the landing track and access the river.
At that time there were very few flights, so there were no problems letting us through.
At that time, the Quilquihue offered a spectacular population of brown trout and its fishing was very productive.
An extraordinary river that I visited several times.